The Power of Forgiveness…

He who cannot forgive breaks the bridge over which he himself must pass George Herbert

Zak Ebrahim was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1983 to an American mother and an Egyptian father, El Sayyid Nosair. When Zak was seven, his father assassinated Meir Kahane, the militant ultra-Orthodox, anti-Arab rabbi who founded the Jewish Defense League. While in prison, Nosair was found guilty in the 1993 World Trade Center bombing trial which killed six people and injured over 1,000 others. He was later convicted as one of the conspirators. Zak’s memoir The Terrorist’s Son charts his own personal journey from hatred to healing.

I remember my early childhood as a happy one although around the age of seven my father exposed me to a side of Islam  that few people  get to see.  In every religion, in every population,  you’ll find a small percentage of people  who hold such fervently beliefs  that they feel they must use any means necessary  to make others live as they do.

A few months prior to his arrest, my father sat me down and explained that  for the past few weekends, he and some friends  had been going to a shooting range on Long Island  for target practice. He told me I’d be going with him the next morning.  We arrived at Calverton Shooting Range,  and when I hit the target my uncle turned to the other men,  and in Arabic said, “Ibn abuh.” [Like father, like son].  Later I realized that they thought they saw in me the same destruction  my father was capable of.  These men were eventually convicted  of placing a van filled with 1,500 pounds of explosives  into the sub-level parking lot of the World Trade Center’s North Tower. These were the men I looked up to, whom I called ammu, which means uncle.

By the time I turned 19  I had already moved 20 times in my life  and that instability meant I found it hard to make friends. I kept my identity a secret  to avoid being targeted,  but even so, being the quiet, chubby new kid in class  was more than enough to get me repeatedly bullied. So for the most part, I spent my time at home.

Growing up around bigotry meant  I’d been raised to judge people  according to their race or religion. One of the first things  that challenged this way of thinking was during the 2000 presidential elections when I was taking part  in the National Youth Convention (a non-partisan organization) in Philadelphia.  Having been the victim of bullying for most of my life I chose to be part of a group that focused on youth violence. The members of our group came from many different walks of life and I soon discovered that one of the kids I’d befriended  was Jewish. I must admit I felt a sense of pride  in having been able to overcome a barrier  that for most of my life I had been led to believe  was insurmountable.

Another major turning point came when I found a summer job in  an amusement park. Most of my life I’d been taught  that homosexuality was a sin and by extension, therefore,  that all gay people were a negative influence.  When I ended up working with some of the gay performers  at a show there,  I soon discovered that many were the kindest,  least judgmental people I had ever met.  Having been bullied as a kid  created an immediate sense of empathy in me  toward the suffering of others.

Then there was, The Daily Show.  On a nightly basis, Jon Stewart forced me  to be intellectually honest with myself about my own bigotry  and helped me to realize that people’s race,  religion or sexual orientation  had nothing to do with the quality of their character.  Inspiration can often come from an unexpected place, and a Jewish comedian did more  to positively influence my worldview  than my own extremist father.

One day, I had a conversation with my mother  about how my worldview was starting to change  and she said something to me that I will hold dear to my heart  for as long as I live.  She looked at me with the weary eyes  of someone who had experienced  enough dogmatism to last a lifetime and said, ”I’m tired of hating people.”  In that instant, I realized how much negative energy  it takes to hold hatred inside of you.

Zak Ebrahim is not my real name.  I changed it when my family decided  to end our connection with my father  and start a new life.  But I speak out in the hope that perhaps someone someday  who is compelled to use violence  may hear my story and realize that there is a better way,  that although I was subjected  to a violent and intolerant ideology, I did not become fanaticized.  No matter how much the levels of violence you have experienced it doesn’t have to define your character because in all of us is the ability to change our paths.

Today’s story was written by Zak Ebrahim and is shared from the following website: http://theforgivenessproject.com/stories/zak-ebrahim-usa/

 

No widget added yet.

Exercise will change your life, and here’s why…

We do not stop exercising because we grow old - we grow old because we stop exercising. Kenneth Cooper

ONE AFTERNOON not long ago, a friend and I were talking at her dining-room table, and I’ll admit it, we were feeling a bit self-righteous.

We’d gone bowling with her parents, and we both noticed her mom could barely roll the lightest ball down the alley. She struggled with a lot of other tasks, too. We didn’t think of her as an elderly person. But there she was, looking feeble.

“Well,” my friend said, shaking her head, “she doesn’t really exercise.” I nodded knowingly.

The way my friend and I see it, there are two kinds of people: exercisers and everyone else. We — the exercisers — prefer to sweat, not sit. They — we’ll call them “the relaxers” — prefer to read, not run. They think we’re nuts. We think they’re slowly letting themselves wither.

We’ll call this The Great Divide, and my friend and I patted ourselves on the back for being on the right side of it. Then we got up to leave.

“Ouch,” I winced, grabbing at my hamstrings.

“I’m sooooo sore!” she groaned.

And as we hobbled away, we felt decidedly less smug.

ARE YOU laughing at us? Nodding sympathetically? Either way, we’ll hazard a guess: Whichever side of The Great Divide you’re on, you can’t imagine living the other way.

“People internalize an image of themselves as an exerciser or not,” says David B. Coppel, a sports psychologist at the University of Washington.

So before we go any further, I’ll confess. I used to think people like me — who exercise four, five, six times a week — were crazy. Three years ago, in the pages of this very magazine, I described my physical condition as being “what you might expect for someone who types for a living.”

Another confession: Despite the incident at the dining-room table, this article is not going to say exercise is bad for you. Sorry, relaxers.

Because we can hear the complaints already, we will admit that at times, if you go overboard, it can definitely beat you up. OK, it can beat you up even if you don’t go overboard.

But we’re going to explain that, too. So stick with us as we take a run at some of the biggest hurdles to becoming an exerciser.

I’m perfectly fine the way I am, thank you. I’m not even overweight.

The truth is, getting up and moving is good even if you’re thin.

It turns out being sedentary is a health risk. Period. It’s up there with high cholesterol, high blood pressure, even smoking, according to a 2010 article in the Journal of the American Heart Association. In fact, fitness level is a “more powerful predictor” of survival than traditional risk factors, the journal says. That means an active person who’s overweight can have a better prognosis than a thin, sedentary person.

Really?

Yes. Exercise:

• Can reduce your risk of getting, or dying from, certain cancers;

• Can delay or avert Type II diabetes, as well as reduce your mortality risk if you have diabetes;

• Can help maintain your cognitive function into old age.

Is that enough? OK, one more thing:

Studies — including one by the American Cancer Society — have shown that sitting itself can take years off your life. It’s not just that you’re burning fewer calories. It’s that certain bodily processes go silent — processes that do things like regulate your insulin and get the fat out of your bloodstream.

“Excessive sitting,” a Mayo Clinic researcher was quoted in The New York Times as saying, “is a lethal activity.”

But I do exercise . . . sometimes.

That’s what a lot of people tell themselves.

In surveys, a consistent 30 to 35 percent of people report moderate to vigorous levels of physical activity. But in the past few years, researchers have begun to outfit study participants with devices that record movement, and the truth has come out: Fewer than 5 percent of adults are doing the recommended level of activity.

Do I really need this? I’m young and healthy.

Yes, says Kevin Conley, a UW radiology professor who has developed contraptions to measure muscle activity as well as something in the muscles called mitochondria. These are the powerhouses, where the body turns fuel into activity.

Conley compared three groups: active adults, inactive adults and the elderly, and looked at fitness in a variety of ways. As expected, the seniors had fewer mitochondria. But so did the inactive adults. In fact, in each area measured, the inactive adults had scores that were close to — or worse than — the old folks.

“Inactivity does the same thing as aging,” Conley says. “It was so astonishing at first I didn’t believe it myself.”

Why should you care? Because it becomes a vicious cycle. Don’t exercise and your mitochondria decline, which makes you less able to move, which leads to fewer mitochondria and so on.

The moral of the story is, you can choose to get old before your time.

But I’m so out of shape.

This is a pet peeve of another local academic, Glen Duncan, associate professor of epidemiology and nutritional sciences at the UW.

“I get very frustrated when people say things like, ‘I can’t walk up the steps,’ ” he says. “The reason you can’t walk up the steps is because you’re deconditioned, and the reason you’re deconditioned is because you never walked up the steps.”

He pauses. “You did it to yourself.”

Didn’t you hear me? I said I can’t walk up the steps.

OK, don’t walk up the steps (yet). Try strength training. Every local expert we talked to, as well as a number of national groups, say strength training, like weight lifting, can be more important than aerobic activity, especially as we age.

If you don’t maintain your strength, things start to slide. It might be the stairs that give you trouble first. Then it’s flat ground. Then it’s getting out of a chair. Seriously. It happens.

I’m afraid I’m going to hurt myself.

You’re right: When you exercise, you’re putting strain on your muscles, your bones, the whole shebang. But that very stress is what tells the body to build.

Scientifically speaking, says Michael Regnier, a bioengineering professor at the UW, “When you exercise, it stimulates the release of hormones that signal the cells to start protein synthesis.”

When you lift a heavy load, it puts compressive forces on your bones. Those compressive forces tell the bones — uh-oh, we’d better get stronger. It increases their density. Cartilage, as well, gets its nutrients from moving. So you are stressing your body; you’re also building it up.

But I’m afraid I’m really going to hurt myself.

Perfectly reasonable. How many times have you read the warning, “Consult your doctor before beginning any exercise program”?

It used to be that health authorities thought it could put people at risk of a sudden heart attack. The advice has always been, take it easy!

Regnier thinks people have followed that advice a little toowell. “They’ve overminimized,” he says.

Health authorities now believe it’s riskier not to exercise. “Sudden death,” a major federal report says, “is, more accurately, a risk of inactivity.”

But I’m too old! Why bother at this point?

Admittedly, when we age, our bodies tend to fall apart on us.

But professor Conley found something interesting with his mitochondria-measuring contraption.

Scientists used to think the decline of those powerhouses was inevitable, and that it started as early as the 40s and 50s.

The bad news is, it is inevitable. The good news is, the inevitable part doesn’t start in middle age. We can stave it off until we’re in our 70s or 80s — if we take the time to exercise.

No widget added yet.

Overcoming Depression – The Emotion Code Can Help!

 Faith is to believe what we do not see; and the reward of this is to see what we believe St. AugustineIf you have not yet heard of or about the Emotion Code, you are going to get a taste of it today! I first encountered The Emotion Code 4 or 5 years ago while visiting with a friend. My initial interest in it stemmed from the thought that it might be able to help children with RAD (Reactive Attachment Disorder). I did some quick research and found an email address and made contact with Dr. Brad Nelson – author and developer of The Emotion Code.

Since that time, I have had the good fortune of meeting Dr. Nelson,personally, and I have learned much more about The Emotion Code and how it works. I have seen, first hand, it’s effectiveness and the healing that can result from its use. I have become certified in using the Emotion Code and I continue to use it almost daily on myself, my family, and clients.

How I wish that I had known about the Emotion Code when I was suffering with depression! While it is not an overnight miracle, it is an invaluable weapon in the fight against depression and any effort to regain health. I am grateful for Dr. Brad Nelson and his work. I am especially appreciative of and respect Dr. Nelson’s insistence of the inclusion of divine guidance with each session performed.

In the last year, I have revamped my book, A Glimpse of Heaven. It has a new cover and now has a foreword by Dr. Brad Nelson. I was very grateful when Dr. Nelson agreed to do the foreword for my book. I deeply respect him and his wife and I am ever so grateful for their work and their sefforts to bring healing to this world.

The Emotion Code is a healing modality which identifies trapped emotions and then releases them using the governing acupuncture meridian. Our bodies are made of energy. We look like we are one solid mass but, in actuality, we are a highly functioning mass of bits of energy! Emotions are also made of energy. Everything around us is made of energy!

When we experience emotions, those emotions can (and often do) become trapped in various areas of our bodies. When this happens, the functioning of our bodies and our health is impacted. For example, an emotion that is trapped in the liver can prevent the liver from performing as well as it would function if the trapped emotion were not present in the liver. With the emotion code, that trapped emotion can be identified and then removed from the liver. When trapped emotions are released, they help our physical health and they can help our emotional and spiritual health, as well.

If you are suffering from depression or any other illness, I hope you will take a look at The Emotion Code by Dr. Bradley Nelson. You can purchase The Emotion Code from Dr. Nelson’s website:

www.healerslibrary.com: https://www.healerslibrary.com/our-products/

or from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/Emotion-Code-Bradley-Nelson/dp/0979553709/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1510271830&sr=8-1&keywords=emotion+code+by+dr.+bradley+nelson&dpID=51ke37DdTaL&preST=_SY291_BO1,204,203,200_QL40_&dpSrc=srch

Today, I am sharing a testimonial by Alisa Fisher. Alisa is now a certified Emotion Code practitioner. As you will see, she and her husband have been greatly benefited by the Emotion Code. Enjoy!:

At the age of forty-nine my husband John was diagnosed with PTSD and depression from childhood trauma, a few traumatic accidents, two near-death illnesses, twenty years in an abusive first marriage, and a high-conflict divorce. To top it all off, he lost his health, and subsequently his physical ability to remodel homes, which he had done for over twenty years.

He felt totally broken in mind, body and spirit.  He struggled to function in almost every way.  He had tried multiple psychotropic medications to manage the depression and anxiety, with no success.  In fact, they made his situation worse.  John was my first PTSD client.  He agreed to be my “guinea pig,” and put Dr. Nelson’s PTSD eradication promise to the test.

After clearing his Heart-Wall and his body of all Trapped Emotions, his PTSD melted away. He immediately followed his passion for filmmaking and enrolled in cinematography school, has won scholarships for his grades, and now works directly with troubled couples at a marriage crisis company as their Director of Client Services.  To this day he does not struggle with PTSD or depression at all.

Since this experience with John, I have seen many people emerge from the shadows of depression after clearing their Heart-Walls and bodies of all Trapped Emotions. I have also seen that doing this work allows people to become emotionally and mentally strong enough to address the issues in their lives that cause depression. This is the potential of the Emotion Code in our lives!

– Alisa Fisher, Certified Emotion Code Practitioner

Today’s article on the Emotion Code is shared from the following website: https://www.healerslibrary.com/emotion_code/the-emotion-code-alleviates-ptsd-and-depression/

No widget added yet.