The Effects of Your Positive Words

 

Gratitude is the healthiest of all human emotions. The more you express gratitude for what you have, the more likely you will have even more to express gratitude for. Zig Ziglar

Thousands have lived without love, not one without water.
— W. H. Auden

Water… we are surrounded by it. It drops on us from clouds as rain. We bathe in water and we use water for cleansing everything. Oceans, rivers, lakes… they all consist of a large quantity of water. Most of the time we take water for granted. We drink it, we waste it but the main problem is we do not realize water is more than just water. Water is so much more than we think and in this article, we will talk about the importance of water and the connection between water and positive words.

Positive vs. Negative

Did you know one positive word can change water’s structure? There is proof. A Japanese scientist named Masaru Emoto made a series of tests and discovered some very interesting results. Emoto realized both positive and negative words can have an influence on water’s structure by changing water’s crystals. During his study of water, Emoto came to some fascinating revelations. He came to a belief that water was the so-called ‘’blueprint of our reality’’ and our emotional energy and vibrations can change the physical structure of water. Emoto’s tests mostly consisted of putting water in glasses and then exposing it to different words, pictures, and music and then freezing it and analyzing how water crystals look. And through his research and analysis, he came to the conclusion that if we “influence” water with positive words, pictures, or music that water crystals will be nicely formed. On the other hand, if one puts water near negative influences, such as saying negative words, or if you turn on some loud heavy metal music then the results would be the total opposite. Those water crystals will be distorted and formed in an ugly and negative formation.

What Emoto also believed is water from different sources will have different crystal formations by default. This means water from a mountain stream will have a different molecular structure than water from our homes.

Differences in the appearance of water crystals through different influences are visible in Emoto’s photographs. Positive words created nicely shaped crystals, while negative words created ugly, disease-like crystals making water appear dirty and sick.

Also, water crystals looked different when influenced with different genre of music. Water reacts differently when, for example, playing soft melodies of Mozart versus strong and aggressive sounds of heavy metal.

Say Positive Words to People Around You!

Above, we read how Dr. Emoto discovered how water reacts differently when influenced by both positive and negative influences.

But what happens with us when we are influenced by both positive and negative things? Do we react the same way water reacts? Does our molecule structure also change when someone says something nice to us?

The answer for that is simply — yes.

Humans are 60 percent made of water and as such we are also prone to changes. Our molecule structure also changes when influenced by different words, music, movies, scenes of violence (or love), etc.

If a person is positive, cheerful and optimistic, it can change how other persons around him or she will feel. That person can, just by being close to others, spread positive energy. There are many real-life proofs that being positive (just like negativity) spreads and it’s the same with positive and negative words (words of gratitude, affection, complimenting words), music and songs that spread positivity, even nice pictures. The water in us reacts to those positive things and because of that, we need to say positive words to other people around us, our family, our lovers, our coworkers. Your positive words will make everyone feel better. After all, positivity is something that all of us need.

So, next time when you want to say something to someone, think for a second or two. Because even one word or one sentence can influence another person for life. Be careful about the words that are coming out of your mouth.

You can make one person’s day just by saying thank you and saying some complimentary words or words of appreciation. Always do your best to be positive and to stay positive, because there is always something nice and beautiful you can be thankful for today. And before you know it, the feeling of joy will spread, bringing a smile and that spark of life to others.

And that is something all of us should do.

Today’s article was written by Mehdi Toozhy and is shared from the following website: https://www.huffingtonpost.com/mehdi-toozhy/the-effects-of-your-posit_b_9557912.html

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5 Ways to Spot the Miracles in Your Life

Give thanks unto the LORD, call upon his name, make known his deeds among the people 1 Chronicles 16:34

Miracles can brighten your day, comfort your soul and strengthen your faith. Learn how to see them everywhere.

I have been thinking a lot about miracles lately. Miracles are big, some are small and I think most might even go unnoticed. Miracles can brighten your day, comfort your soul and strengthen your faith. The best part is there are already miracles in your life. Here’s how to spot them. Slow down

You are busy. I am busy. Everyone is busy. Some people bask in the glorification of busy. Technology, work, activities, competition—all these things can overwhelm your life. Stop. If even for a moment, just stop. Two words that pierce my soul every time I hear or read them are: Be still. I have these two words plastered around my workspace, my home, and even my phone. Be present. Surround yourself with your family. Surround yourself with the moments miracles are made of.

Spot tender mercies

David Bednar said, “Tender mercies of the Lord are real and … do not occur randomly or merely by coincidence.” What is a tender mercy? Bednar describes them as personal and individualized blessings, strength, protection, assurances, guidance, loving-kindnesses, consolation, support and spiritual gifts. Knowing these tender mercies are sent to us personally is a miracle in itself. See how many tender mercies you can recognize today.

Believe to see

I was recently watching a classic movie, Charlotte’s Web, with my daughter, and one part really stood out to me. Fern’s mother asks the question, “Do you understand how there could be writing in a spider’s web?” And the doctor simply replies, “Oh no, I don’t understand it. But for that matter, I don’t understand how a spider learned to spin a web in the first place. When the words appeared everyone said they were a miracle. But nobody pointed out that the web itself is a miracle.”

How many miracles are already present in our lives, every day? Miracles aren’t just events like the parting of the Red Sea. They include simple moments like a baby’s first smile or the beauty of the earth. Miracles should inspire not only awe but also gratitude.

Be grateful and prayerful

Speaking of gratitude, I believe this is an essential attribute to recognizing miracles. Practicing thankfulness, paired with prayer, makes it almost impossible to not see the miracles that bless your life. Say a prayer of gratitude. You might be surprised at the miracles already there, ones you just may not have noticed. A prayer of gratitude is often the answer you need.

Write it down

Many people have a gratitude journal or something of the like. Mine is called a tender mercy journal. I don’t write in it every day. But when I’m feeling disconnected or in extra need of God’s love, I’ll commit to writing down every tender mercy I see in a day, a week or so on. I find that when I’m purposely looking for them, they are more easily found. And when they are written down, they are not easily forgotten.

Everyone experiences miracles. They are already happening in your life. You just need to know how and where to look. Instead of trying to over-analyze everything, try recognizing things as miracles. Big or small, each one is significant and meant just for you.

This article was written by Becky Squire. Becky is a wife and mother of 4. She enjoys music, running, and baking. Becky blogs at Make Mine Happy.

Website: http://makeminehappy.com

This article was shared from the following website: https://www.famifi.com/22794/5-ways-to-spot-the-miracles-in-your-life

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What Are The Steps Of Positive Thinking?

We Become What We Think About Earl Nightingale

The most potent form of energy is thought because thought-waves are cosmic (energy) waves penetrating all time and space.

  • Watch your thoughts, they become words.
  • Watch your words, they become actions.
  • Watch your actions, they become habits.
  • Watch your habits, they become your character.
  • Watch your character, it becomes your destiny.

A man is but the product of his thoughts – what he thinks, he becomes. – Mahatma Gandhi

What Are The Steps Of Positive Thinking?

Becoming a positive thinker is easy when you know the steps of positive thinking…

…and of course, you also apply them! (By the way, do you wonder if you need to study positive thinking?)

All you need to benefit from positive thinking is to replace your negative thoughts with positive ones – this is, to change your focus of attention from something that makes you feel bad to something that makes you feel good.

It *is* that simple!

How do you do that?

Follow these easy steps of positive thinking:

  1. Become aware of your thoughts. You can do this on the spot, throughout the day.If you’ve never paid attention to your thoughts, then you can train yourself to do that by choosing a quiet spot and sitting in silence for a while, just noticing what comes up in your mind. I found it best to do this in the afternoons, after work is done and before taking care of things like making dinner.Most of us are over-identified with our own thoughts, and believe that just because *we* have a certain thought, it means something. But thoughts are just thoughts – they are not yours or mine, and they only have as much weigh as you want to give them.
  2. Notice the thoughts that make you feel bad. This is easy to do: your emotions (fear, jealousy, worry, anger…) will tell you that you are on a ‘negative’ train of thought.For instance, think about the subject of money. How do you feel? Anxious, nervous, scared? What thoughts come to mind? ‘Money is hard to make’, ‘I never have enough money’ are perhaps some of those thoughts.Taking this step can also help you to uncover the root of your beliefs (most of them would have been acquired during your childhood) and set yourself free to choose new beliefs.
  3. Change your negative thoughts for positive ones. This is easy: choose thoughts that make you feel good when you think them.You can only think of one thing at a time; if you think about something that makes you feel good then there is no room for feeling bad.For example, if you find yourself worrying about money and bills to pay, you could instead choose to focus on all the abundance that you do have, or you could list situations where money came to you unexpectedly.If you find yourself unable to think about a certain subject in a way that makes you feel good, then choose to think about something else that does make you feel good. The point is to change your train of thought and thus your emotions.

Why can I not change my thoughts?

Sometimes, you might notice, it is not so easy to change your thoughts about a certain subject. You may try to think about it in a way that makes you feel good, yet you find that there is no way you can feel good about it.

The thing is, when you have thought about a subject in a certain way for a long time, you have ‘walked’ that path of thought so often that it seems the only path available.

Some of the big subjects where we may find difficulty changing our thoughts are money, relationships, and health.

In these cases, it is best to first practice changing your thoughts about something small.

For example, do you get upset when you have to queue for a while? Next time, change the direction of your thoughts by focusing on whatever benefits you can find to queuing – “This chair is actually quite comfortable”, “I now have time to just relax”, “I can now read a few more pages of this book”.

As you practice following the steps of positive thinking about small things, you get the hang of it and it becomes easier to change your thoughts on larger subjects.

You can also use your thoughts to ‘program’ yourself a good day: get up to positive thinking; or you can use positive thinking to change your thoughts about your own life.

Summing up the steps of positive thinking:

  1. Become aware of your thoughts
  2. Use your emotions as a way to discover your negative thoughts
  3. Put your attention on thoughts that make you feel good

The trick, as you would have probably imagined, is to repeat these steps often, with many different subjects, and to start small in the subjects where you find it difficult.

As you do that consistently, you start changing your overall perception of life, and life starts changing for you.

Use the following resources to help yourself when following the steps of positive thinking:

  • Positive thinking activities
  • Positive self statements
  • Positive thinking tips
  • Positive thinking programs

You can then expand on these steps of positive thinking with the Law of Attraction, which shows you how you can intentionally use your thoughts to achieve or obtain what you want. Discover how the Law of Attraction, positive thinking and quantum physics relate.

In the words of Henri Matisse…

“There are always flowers for those who want to see them.”

Today’s article was written by Cristina Diaz and is shared from the following website: http://www.the-benefits-of-positive-thinking.com/steps-of-positive-thinking.html

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How To Use The Power of Gratitude; An Easy Way To Feel Happier Everyday

Gratitude is a currency that we can mint for ourselves, and spend without fear of bankruptcy Fred DeWitt Van Amburgh

In my book Nothing Changes Until You Do, I tell the story of a simple but powerful conversation I had with a cabdriver a few years back that had a profound impact on me. I was in Houston, Texas, on my way back to the airport to fly home after speaking at a conference. The driver and I began talking. He had a beautiful accent. Based on how he looked and sounded, I assumed he was from somewhere in Africa, but I couldn’t tell exactly where. It didn’t come up in what we were talking about, so I didn’t ask.

Right before we got to the airport, however, there was a pause in our conversation, so I inquired, “By the way, where are you from originally?”

“I’m from Ethiopia,” he said. He then proudly stated, “I’ve been here in the U.S. for twenty years. I’m an American citizen now; so are both of my boys and my wife.”

I’m not exactly sure what prompted me, but I then asked him, “What’s your perspective on American culture, given that you didn’t grow up here?”

At first he didn’t say anything, and I thought maybe I had offended him. We were just arriving at the airport. He pulled up to the curb, put the cab in park, turned around, and looked me right in the eye.

“Can I be honest with you?” he asked.
“Sure,” I said.
“Well,” he said, “I think most people in this culture act like spoiled brats.”
“Why do you say that?” I asked.
“Look, I’m from Ethiopia,” he said. “Every day here is a good day.”

I was taken aback by the simplicity, wisdom, and power of his statement. And, I was grateful for the reminder.

Gratitude is a Practice, Not A Concept
I’ve been speaking and writing about gratitude for many years, and I’m still amazed at how challenging it can be to focus on what I’m grateful for at times. We live in a culture that has an obsession with negativity, and it’s easy for us to get caught up in how “bad” things are, as well as in our own personal and insatiable desire for more, thinking that what we have and how things are in our own lives is never quite good enough. However, regardless of the specific circumstances of our lives, even and especially when they’re difficult, if we stop, pay attention, and look for it, there are always so many things we can be grateful for—if we choose to be. Gratitude is a practice, not a concept. And, like any other practice, the more genuine and consistent we are with it, the more valuable and beneficial it is.

Most of us, especially those of us on a path of personal growth and discovery, know that gratitude is important. We’ve heard about it, read about it, and been taught about it for years. In the mid 1990s a wonderful book called Simple Abundance by Sarah Ban Breathnach came out. Sarah was a featured guest on The Oprah Winfrey Show, and Oprah talked about how Sarah’s suggestion to keep a daily gratitude journal—to write down five things each day that you’re grateful for—had a profound impact on her life. Oprah became a passionate advocate for the power of gratitude and since that time has continued to encourage millions of people around the world to keep their own gratitude journals.

Create A Gratitude Journal
Like so many other people, I took Oprah’s advice and started my own journal many years ago. I found it to be fun, inspiring, and empowering to look for, find, and write down things I was grateful for. When I started speaking, coaching, and writing, much of my work focused on gratitude and appreciation. The technique of the gratitude journal was something I often suggested to people. However, over time it became one of the many things that I “know” and even “teach,” but had stopped practicing consistently in my own life.

A few years back, as a New Year’s resolution, I recommitted myself to the practice of my gratitude journal. I bought a new, beautiful journal and decided I was going to start using it. It took me a little while to get back into the practice of writing in it consistently, but once I was in the swing of it, it was pretty easy. Later that year I had a few months where things were going really well in many important areas of my life. As I sat down to write in my gratitude journal one morning, I decided to look back at some of the things I’d written over the past few months.

As I turned the pages, I realized that I hadn’t missed a day of writing in over three months. I was amazed. It was less about the consistency of my writing, and more about the consistency of my excitement to do this exercise and the benefits I got from it. Things were going so well in my life, and the positive turns seemed to be directly connected to my use of the gratitude journal. I said to my wife, Michelle, “I’m not sure if things are going so well because I’m writing in my gratitude journal every day, or I’m excited to write in my gratitude journal every day because things are going so well. I bet it’s a combination of both. At some level, I don’t really care—I’m just grateful for how things are going and for my journaling practice.”

The way gratitude works is that the more we focus on feeling grateful, the more we have to feel grateful for. And while many of us have experienced this personally, recent scientific studies have concluded that gratitude can have significantly positive effects on our health, our moods, our productivity, and our relationships.

In one specific study, conducted by Robert A. Emmons, Ph.D., at the University of California at Davis and Mike McCullough at the University of Miami, participants were given one of three tasks. Each week, they kept a short journal. One group was asked to write down five things they were grateful for that had occurred in the past week, another was asked to record five hassles from the previous week that displeased them, and the neutral group was asked to list five events or circumstances that affected them, but they weren’t told whether to focus on something positive or negative specifically.

Ten weeks later, the people in the gratitude group felt better about their lives as a whole, plus they reported fewer health complaints, and exercised more.

Like many other things in life that we know are good for us (exercise, eating healthy, sleeping enough, drinking lots of water, telling the truth, and so on), it’s not the knowledge that will benefit us; it’s the practice. The amazing thing about gratitude is that there’s no “right” way to practice being grateful. Whether you choose to keep a journal, thank the people around you, use positive affirmations, ask other people what they’re grateful for (one of my favorites), focus on gratitude in your quiet time of prayer or meditation, or simply remind yourself to slow down and breathe—taking time to focus on what we’re grateful for is one of the easiest and most effective ways to empower ourselves, calm ourselves down, and remember what matters most in life.

Today’s article was written by Mike Robbins and is shared from the following website: https://www.healyourlife.com/how-to-use-the-power-of-gratitude

 

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Don’t Miss This Incredible Video on Gratitude!

The secret to have abundance: Stay focused on what you love and express is fearlessly Anonymous

I had to share this video today! Never underestimate the power of gratitude! I am convinced that gratitude is one of the most powerful choices we can make! I hope you will watch…and then start your own gratitude project!

Today’s video is shared from www.365gratitude.com

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