We are Capable of the Impossible!

“It’s impossible,” said Pride “It’s risky,” said Experience “It’s Pointless,” said Reason “Give it a try,” said the Heart ¨Unknown

Do you have accomplishing the “Impossible” burning in your heart? Do people tell you that your dreams are impossible and that they will never happen?

There is a secret to accomplishing impossible tasks – YOU have to believe that they are possible! Not just on a conscious level but on a subconscious level as well.

We all have an important contribution to make to the world – what is yours?

As you dream over this holiday weekend, I hope that you will be inspired by the following fun facts!:

Fun Facts about Great Accomplishments

All the world’s greats would never have been great if they had listened to the opinion of even their closest friends.

Caruso, the world’s greatest tenor, was told his voice sounded like a tin can.

Thomas Edison, the inventor of motion pictures, was advised that no-one would pay to listen to sound coming from a screen.

Edison told Henry Ford to give up making cars and work for him instead and make millions.

Marie Curie was told to forget about radium.

Laurence Olivier was told by friends to give up acting.

Benjamin Franklin was told to stop fiddling with lightning.

People told Johnny Weissmuller (Tarzan) that no-one would ever beat his fifty swimming records. His 1936 world record was the qualifying time for the 1972 Olympics! Attitudes of the time said his records could never be beaten. Now 12 year old girls regularly beat his times.

Christopher Columbus took 14 years to raise funding for his ships and crew before setting out on his explorations. The science and culture of the day had said that the world was flat. However, Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand of Spain had faith in Columbus. With that faith and money behind him, Columbus took just six months to discover the New World.

In the same way, a “flat-world mind-set” can limit our thinking and lead to mediocrity. In the same way that you can train fleas to jump a certain height in a bowl, when you take away the bowl, they still do not jump higher than the learned height.

Our mind can tie us down and limit us, so that mediocrity becomes our destiny. Negative attitudes get cemented in concrete.

Abraham Lincoln grew up in a very difficult environment. He had less than one year of formal schooling. He experienced defeat and failure year after year, but is one of the greatest success stories of all time. In spite of everything, he had the right attitude to achieve success.

Today’s fun facts shared from the following website: http://fortunefavours.blogspot.com/2007/07/people-who-achieved-impossible-with_12.html

 

No widget added yet.

God Never Gives Us a Dream That We Cannot Accomplish

God never gives you a dream that matches your budget, He’s not checking your bank account, He’s checking your faithI know, from my near-death experience, that the passions we have, the dreams we have of pursuing positive, uplifting endeavors are a gift from God.

When we listen to our hearts and pursue the good things that our hearts yearn for, we become a tool in God’s hand and we keep the promises we made to our Creator before we came to this world.

What God-given desires, passions and gifts do you have?

Listen to your heart and you will know!

I hope you love today’s story as much as I do!

Dreams Do Come True

As a child, my parents, by their example, instilled in me a love for reading. I dreamed of being a writer but the pursuit of dreams was never discussed or encouraged – leaving me to write in secret in my room.

Life progressed, however, and an interest in interior design surfaced in my teens. However, at my parents’ insistence, I enrolled in secretarial school and worked in that area contentedly, for twenty years.

Married with two children at thirty-eight, I grew restless. I was unhappy with my job and felt exhausted at the end of the day. I wanted to do something creative with my life. “Life begins at forty” became my mantra.

A growing addiction to decorating shows on television reawakened my teenage interest. As I devoured every word and every scene, I vowed that I would let nothing deter me from becoming an interior designer.

With my fortieth birthday ten months away, I signed up for a two-year interior-decorating course. I crammed two years of work into nine months to ensure that I received my diploma for my fortieth birthday. I met my self-imposed deadline with twelve days to spare and I was ecstatic.

The next step was to get some hands-on experience at a design firm. A visit to a newly opened interiors showroom ushered me into a dream job that opened more opportunities for me than I could have ever imagined. I donned the hat of a decorating consultant at the showroom and I was on my way to creating the career I envisioned.

Opportunity knocked at my door in 1997. I peeked and saw the possibility of writing a decorating column for a woman’s magazine. The editor liked the idea and the monthly column debuted in February 1998.

Writing did not only open doors for decorating projects, it also provided me with the opportunity to teach interior decorating classes. A three-year teaching experience added a new dimension to my career while the confidence and reputation I gained were invaluable.

In the midst of the enjoying my new career and the diversity of experiences, I realized that I was involved in doing something I dreamed of as a child. I was writing. To master the finer skills, I signed up for a freelance writing course. Encouraging feedback from tutors gave me the confidence to submit my work for publication on the internet.

An online newsletter published the story of my mission to redefine myself and pursue my dream. The response from readers was unexpected and overwhelming. From around the world, people emailed to say that they identified with my experience. Some even asked for advice. They inspired me to write self-care articles and motivational pieces, especially for women. Soon, this hobby had developed into a passion that consumed me–and my writing.

Nevertheless, working a full time job and struggling to write at night while fighting sleep and fatigue did not whittle away at my determination to be a full time freelance writer. I hung on because I had another dream — to retire at fifty, even though my fifty-first birthday was staring me in the face.

Prompted by my husband and grown, working children, I handed in my resignation on the 8th of August 2006. The next day, knowing that I will have the time to do the kind of research and writing I enjoy, I sent my writing resume and copies of my published clips to the three local newspapers in my country. I contacted every editor I had worked with before to let them know that I would be available for assignments.

One week before I left, the oldest and largest newspaper in my country commissioned me to write a weekly motivational/inspirational column for their Sunday pullout magazine for women. On the 30th August 2006, eighteen days before I turned fifty-one, I left my office for the last time.

I now write two regular columns while researching and writing feature articles on a variety of other topics, mostly for publication in online magazines. Three books are works in progress and my website is under construction.

My family tells me that I look younger and seem more energetic. I am living my childhood dream, doing what I love. I am a fulltime freelance writer with yet another dream — to be a motivational speaker.

On my journey, I have learned that it is never too late to pursue, and live your dream.

Story shared from the following website: http://www.values.com/your-inspirational-stories/194-dreams-do-come-true

No widget added yet.