Life on Purpose: 15 Questions to Discover Your Personal Mission

The most extraordinary people in the world today don’t have a career. They have a mission. Vishen Lakhiani What should I do with my life? Click here.

Life on Purpose: 15 Questions to Discover Your Personal Mission

Photo by Thomas Hawk

I believe that we were all sent here for a reason and that we all have significance in the world. I genuinely feel that we are all blessed with unique gifts. The expression of our gifts contributes to a cause greater than ourselves.

First, a personal story

Last year, I was running at full speed; chasing after my dream of money and ‘success’. However, I had forgotten why I was running. Luckily, I met Jim (not his real name). Jim had achieved all the financial goals I was reaching for. He had financial independence, several successful businesses, homes in multiple countries, and the luxury to afford the finest things money could buy.

Through hard work, persistence and sheer action; he had made it! But, Jim was not happy. He did not have the free time to enjoy his wealth. He wanted a family. He wanted peace. He wanted to live his life… but he was not able to. He had too many responsibilities, too much to lose, and too many things to protect. He had spent years building his castle, and now that it is complete, he is spending his time keeping it from eroding.

Getting to know Jim was a life altering and eye opening experience. His words snapped me out of my state of ‘unconsciousness’. It became clear to me that, “I did not want to spend the next 10 years chasing after money, only to find that I’ll be back at the same place I am at today; emotionally, mentally, and spiritually”. My ‘chase’ came to a screeching halt, everything was put on hold, and I spent the next two months re-evaluating my life and purpose.

These questions were running through my mind:

What am I chasing after? Why am I chasing it? What is my purpose? Why was I put here?

While reading “E-Myth: Why Most Small Businesses Don’t Work“, I found myself in tears during the chapter on finding purpose. In that chapter, Michael Gerber asks the readers to do a visualization exercise. Through his guidance, he instructs you to vividly picture the day of your funeral. What do you want your eulogy to consist of? What would your lifetime achievements be? What would matter the most at the end of your life? Is it what you are doing right NOW?

I started writing. It began by listing all the things that are most important to me. I wrote down all the things I wanted to do. I re-visited my personal mission statement. I decided that whatever venture I commit to must align with my personal mission, my values and my goals. For every new opportunity that comes along, I would ask myself how it aligns with my goals. Regardless of how much money I could acquire, if the venture did not align with where I wanted to be, then I would not pursue it. Here is my personal mission statement:

To Empower, motivate and inspire people to living happier and more fulfilled lives.

Here are some of my values and goals:

  • What matters most is my connection with myself, being present and feeling blissful.
  • What I value most is having meaningful relationships with people. Being able to connect with people on deep levels.
  • I plan to be financially independent, and have control of my time and location. I plan to work only on projects and causes that I connect with. I plan to acquire my finances without violating my values, goals and personal mission.
  • I plan to travel and live in different parts of the world. Experiencing different cultures, documenting them in photographs and sharing them with others.
  • I will buy my mom a house in Vancouver with a ravine in the backyard. That’s a dream of hers and I’d like to fulfill it.
  • Having a family is important to me. I desire a deep, loving relationship with my spouse.
  • To live everyday fully as if it was my last.

15 Questions to Discover Your Life Purpose

The following are a list of questions that can assist you in discovering your purpose. They are meant as a guide to help you get into a frame of mind that will be conducive to defining your personal mission.

Simple Instructions:

  • Take out a few sheets of loose paper and a pen.
  • Find a place where you will not be interrupted. Turn off your cell phone.
  • Write the answers to each question down. Write the first thing that pops into your head. Write without editing. Use point form. It’s important to write out your answers rather than just thinking about them.
  • Write quickly. Give yourself less than 60 seconds a question. Preferably less than 30 seconds.
  • Be honest. Nobody will read it. It’s important to write without editing.
  • Enjoy the moment and smile as you write.

15 Questions:

1. What makes you smile? (Activities, people, events, hobbies, projects, etc.)

2. What are your favorite things to do in the past? What about now?

3. What activities make you lose track of time?

4. What makes you feel great about yourself?

5. Who inspires you most? (Anyone you know or do not know. Family, friends, authors, artists, leaders, etc.) Which qualities inspire you, in each person?

6. What are you naturally good at? (Skills, abilities, gifts etc.)

7. What do people typically ask you for help in?

8. If you had to teach something, what would you teach?

9. What would you regret not fully doing, being or having in your life?

10. You are now 90 years old, sitting on a rocking chair outside your porch; you can feel the spring breeze gently brushing against your face. You are blissful and happy, and are pleased with the wonderful life you’ve been blessed with. Looking back at your life and all that you’ve achieved and acquired, all the relationships you’ve developed; what matters to you most? List them out.

11. What are your deepest values?

Select 3 to 6 and prioritize the words in order of importance to you.

12. What were some challenges, difficulties and hardships you’ve overcome or are in the process of overcoming? How did you do it?

13. What causes do you strongly believe in? Connect with?

14. If you could get a message across to a large group of people. Who would those people be? What would your message be?

15. Given your talents, passions and values. How could you use these resources to serve, to help, to contribute? ( to people, beings, causes, organization, environment, planet, etc.)

Your Personal Mission Statement

“Writing or reviewing a mission statement changes you because it forces you to think through your priorities deeply, carefully, and to align your behaviour with your beliefs”
~Stephen Covey, ‘7 Habits of Highly Effective People’
A personal mission consists of 3 parts:

  • What do I want to do?
  • Who do I want to help?
  • What is the result? What value will I create?

Steps to Creating Your Personal Mission Statement:

1. Do the exercise with the 15 questions above as quickly as you can.

2. List out actions words you connect with.

a. Example: educate, accomplish, empower, encourage, improve, help, give, guide, inspire, integrate, master, motivate, nurture, organize, produce, promote, travel, spread, share, satisfy, understand, teach, write, etc.

3. Based on your answers to the 15 questions. List everything and everyone that you believe you can help.

a. Example: People, creatures, organizations, causes, groups, environment, etc.

4. Identify your end goal. How will the ‘who’ from your above answer benefit from what you ‘do’?

5. Combine steps 2-4 into a sentence, or 2-3 sentences.

Today’s article was written by Tina Su and is shared from the following website: http://thinksimplenow.com/happiness/life-on-purpose-15-questions-to-discover-your-personal-mission

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How to Build Your Personal Mission Statement and Transform Your Life

A personal mission statement becomes the DNA for every decision we make Stephen CoveyHow to Build Your Personal Mission Statement and Transform Your Life

In order to know where you’re going, it helps to know where you’ve been. All right, I promise, only one cliché for this piece. Keep me honest and bear with me! I start with this to say that in order to best position yourself for a life of happiness, it is extremely helpful to have a philosophy around what you hope to be, and what you intend to accomplish.

Some people call this a personal creed or mission statement. This is written documentation that establishes three things:

1) Your Purpose
2) Your Direction
3) The substance of things that matter to you

Your purpose — or your raison d’être — is the reason why you’re doing what you’re doing with your life. As I wrote about previously, I encourage you to look at this from a blank slate in order to get to the brass-tacks truth of what you really want your mission to be in life. This should be organic and developed only by you — free and unfettered from any influences or emotions of the moment.

Your direction is your plan — and the actions that you must take in order to fulfill the requirements of your plan. Too often, many people doubt themselves because they don’t think they’re ready to begin moving in the direction of what they want to accomplish. They think it’s not their time, they’re lacking in a particular area or they’re too young — they’re hindered by limiting beliefs which beget doubt and fear.

Oftentimes, it simply makes sense to begin even with very tiny steps toward completing tasks and goals that match up with your purpose. This is where writing out your goals and putting them into a plan comes in. This is your direction — the compass that will guide you when life gets in the way, you’re too busy, too tired or hungry. Planning is essential.

“My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive; and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style.” — Maya Angelou

The substance of things that matter to you are part and parcel of your purpose, and should be incorporated, as much as possible, into what you do each day. These are the core values, ideals, principles, people and also the things that bring enthusiasm and passion to your life. Beliefs or activities that get you exciting and mean something to you.

In other words — as Bono once sang, “all that you can’t leave behind.”

The Power of Planning

Successful businesses, schools, hospitals, sports teams and individuals begin by stating their goals and addressing how they intend to achieve them. These collective individuals understand the importance of accountability, and the power behind committing to a specific philosophy. They understand their purpose, what dedicating time and effort to a cause means and what taking ownership over something is all about.

Equally as important as writing a mission statement, is to define — for yourself — what your definition of success is. Never let anyone else define success for you. You should always take the time to do this for yourself. In a competitive landscape, it’s easy to be concerned with how others are doing. To stress and worry about such things is natural. It’s human.

When you have a mission statement, you’ll realize the power behind deciding for yourself how successful you can and will be. Your mission statement and definition of success serve as the foundation for all future attempts at becoming who you hope to be. Several years ago, I wrote mine. Here it is:

To live each moment to the fullest by having a positive attitude, a smile and a genuine enjoyment for life, while giving everything I have to love the people and environment around me and make it a better place.

You’ll notice that this is indeed a philosophy, a high-level view of how I’d like to conduct myself in this world, and a few of the actions I’d like to take. This is not a series of marching orders or specific goals intended for a short duration. Your philosophy is strategic, while short-term goal setting is tactical.

Setting goals helps you focus on specific things you aim to accomplish and how you plan to accomplish them. The mission statement is crucial for establishing the things that matter to you. This leads to the development of your own personal values and principles.

“Outstanding people have one thing in common: An absolute sense of mission.” — Zig Ziglar

There have likely been millions of thought impulses that have flashed through your mind during the course of your life. Even for those of you in your teen years. These thought impulses are acted upon, left in the recesses of your subconscious mind or ignored. Your thoughts lead to your life’s experiences and those experiences are often shared in the company of others.

All of these things have an enormous impact on how you make decisions. Your decisions will impact your course in life and whether you will find yourself happy, ambivalent or disappointed.

When I think back to putting together my philosophy, I reminisce about past relationships, experiences, thought impulses and emotions. I think of the times when I’ve been happiest, times I’ve been down, moments of peace and distress, and the times I’ve found my greatest inspiration. My inspiration is derived from my core philosophy.

“A small body of determined spirits fired by an unquenchable faith in their mission can alter the course of history.” — Mahatma Gandhi

My motivation comes from the “fire” inside of me, the indescribable power that fuels my dreams and inner creativity. I acknowledge this “fire” as a gift that God has given me. A beautiful, divine power that I believe all of us can tap into if we have the desire and we believe.

This power will lead us to personal freedom, greater clarity of thought, vitality and energy to bring into our everyday lives. All this requires is a willingness to believe in God and yourself, and the desire to get to the core of what fuels your inner fire. Introspection and deep, personal reflection are key to living a life of freedom.

They help us to analyze our experiences and thoughts, and determine how we can use them to our future advantage. They provide us with a greater sense of direction and purpose. Along with your mission statement, they form the backbone of your future destiny.

Today’s article was written by Christopher D. Connors and is shared from the following website: https://medium.com/personal-growth/how-to-build-your-personal-mission-statement-and-transform-your-life-5b77e59717d8

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Every Life Matters…Everyone has a Mission!

Outstanding people have one thing in common: An absolute sense of mission Zig Ziglar

Why You Need to Tell Your Story to the World

Who are you? I bet you have a story to tell. Will you tell it? What would be the cost to you in your life if you choose not to tell your story? What would you like to share with the people who know you- and those who don’t?

Of all the things that you can do to make the world a better place, few things are more valuable and beneficial than telling your story. Great platforms such as this one, right here on Medium, blast the doors wide open to affording people, like you and me, this privilege. No one can tell your story better than you can. Chances are, you will help others and yourself in the process.

Where have you been and what have you learned? What do you hold dear? What have you endured and what has made you tougher? How have your experiences enlightened you and in turn, inspired and informed you to produce positive change for others?

Is your story a sad one, a trial of difficulties and hurtful experiences? If so, plenty of people will want to empathize and learn from the battles you’ve fought. And when you’re ready to tell that story, you’ll find that opening up to a person or community that you can trust, will allow a big weight to plummet from off of your shoulders.

The World Has Much To Gain From Your Story

I, for one, would love to know the values that you cling to; what matters in your life. Why and where you’re going to the places you are, and how you plan to get there. Do you realize the power that your words and actions have and how you can impact others, whatever your chosen path is in life?

Past, present and future, we have adventures, trials, failures, journeys and epic wins to share with people. There isn’t an excuse, really, if you don’t let others know your story. There’s so much to gain from the knowledge you possess. You will know your story- and the lessons that accompany it- better than anything else you’ll ever know in this world.

We waste time on websites like Twitter becoming followers, on Facebook being fans, all while we could be leaders today. The worst mistake we can make in life is thinking that other people don’t care what we have to say.

As I’ve consulted with business leaders, coached professionals and students, and learned from others, I’ve realized that each individual has a tremendous amount to contribute to humanity. Everyone can make a positive difference in the world through storytelling.

Stories of interest, humor, intellect, science, art, sport, love and more.

Our stories are unique, genuine and real. They are better told when we have the stage alone to ourselves. It certainly takes courage to tell your story- or any great story for that matter. There’s so much to lose by living in fear and passing on the opportunity to impact the lives of others. When we tell stories we’re excited about, we get excited and animated. We deliver them like they’re impassioned pleas to rejoice in the experience!

If you’ve never tried, I hope you’re willing to take the first step.

Find The Courage

Five years ago, a very good friend of mine invited me to join the young adult community at his church. Not long after, there I was, nervous as can be, sharing my personal story with a room of 40 strangers. I went into detail about my upbringing, my values, my family and my “why” for living. I shared the story of my life, how important faith is to me and the aspirations that drive me to be the man I am.

It was positively liberating!

I certainly didn’t deliver a Steve Jobs-like effort and believe me, it was no, “I Have a Dream speech.” But I got my message across in a manner that was sincere, honest, authentic and open. I may have influenced the lives of people in that room and maybe I inspired others to pursue their dreams more fervently. I don’t know that for certain. But it certainly made me feel better and I received very genuine, heartfelt praise afterwards.

That moment served as a springboard for me to want to share more of story and my journey with others.

The important thing is that I took the first step: I told my story- I gave it a shot. I encourage you to tell your story, when you feel the time is right. Trust me when I say, people want to hear it. As I have learned, the world is demanding it! The world needs you to tell your story.

Go forth in confidence and watch as the wave of positive emotions wash over your life and the lives of others.

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It’s Never Too Late to Achieve Your Personal Mission!

The most extraordinary people in the world today don’t have a career, they have a mission Vishen Lakhiani

Success Despite Age

Everyone’s career seems to be flourishing. Everyone seems to be on top of their game. Everyone hustles like crazy.

Yet, you feel stuck.

You work day-by-day, but you don’t get the results you are hoping for. You keep writing the story you think everyone deserves to read, but no one looks at it.

You think you are too old to prosper. Or it’s already late to start.

After all, it seems like everyone already grabbed the opportunities existing. It seems like the universe can’t cater for you anymore.

And the only option you have is to just give up. Go with the flow. Or let life sail on its own.

But wait up!

There are people who want to send some inspiration to you. They are included in the league of Harland Sanders, Stan Lee and among many others.

Their lives are inspiring. And they want to tell you it’s never too late for a dream to prosper.

1. Laura Ingalls Wilder

Growing up, Wilder repeatedly moved from places to places. With a desire to help her family, she decided to become a teacher.

She quit teaching when she got married and helped her husband in the farm. Following the death of their one-month old son, her husband became partially paralyzed.

She was 43 years old when her daughter, Rose, encouraged her to write a memoir about her childhood. Her first attempt on writing her autobiography has been rejected several times.

Determined to succeed, she spent the next several years improving it. The publishers agreed to publish her work in a form of fiction story for young children.

She was 65 years old when “Little House in the Big Woods” was published. She wrote other “Little House” series including the last one that came out at age 76.

Wisdom: Write and Rewrite Your Story ’til You Reach the Ending You Wish.

Wilder’s story is an inspiring example of rising despite difficulties and age. She did not let her age stop the unveiling of her talents.

Her experiences became an added bonus that made her story worthy to share.

You have a story to share. Start writing it now because you never know when the right time knocks on your door. You don’t want to open it only to give an empty hand.

That would mean a wasted opportunity!

Your pains, your triumphs, your victories, your challenges — they are all perfect part of your story. Each part will serve as an inspiration to one or two.

It will not happen if you won’t share it with them. It’s not only through writing. Share it on the area you are gifted with.

2. Harry Bernstein

Harry Bernstein encountered an unbearable loneliness after the death of his wife. This event served as the catalyst to start writing his first published book.

Prior to writing it, he worked for different production companies as a magazine editor and freelance writer until the age of 62.

He started writing the book, The Invisible Wall: A Love Story That Broke Barriers, when he was 93. It recounts his childhood experiences including the struggle his family underwent during World War I. The book was published when he was 96.

Wisdom: Hardships and Depression are Meant to Challenge You, Not to Stop You.

What excuses are you telling yourself right now?

Do not let heartaches or failures impede your growth. Remember that they are part of life and they may always come any moment.

Rising above those pain will make you a stronger person.

Whatever situation you have, you can always turn a seemingly curse into a blessing. You can convert a doom into a room of happiness.

You can always choose to make tomorrow better than today. It’s only you who can choose.

3. Gladys Burrill

Gladys Burrill is truly one incredible woman. She had been an aircraft pilot, mountain climber, hiker and a horseback rider. But these things are not what she is known for.

She had her first marathon when she was 86 years old. She became famous after completing the Honolulu Marathon at the age of 92.

Wait, marathon? 92 years old? Yessss!

Though she power-walked and jogged all throughout, she managed to reach the finish line. Even though it took her nine hours and 53 minutes to finish, she is proud of reaching the goal she set.

She is determined to do it, and so she did.

In turn, she was recognized by Guinness World Records and Hawaii House of Representatives for her wonderful story.

Today’s inspiring article was shared from the following website: https://medium.com/the-mission/9-late-bloomer-success-stories-who-prove-its-never-too-late-to-achieve-your-dreams-b036688da6f

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Creating a Meaningful Life

Efforts and Courage are not enough without Purpose and Direction John F. KennedyI just had to share today’s story about Jack LaLanne. This probably dates me but I remember when Jack was a frequent personality on television!

As a young person, I have to admit that I never had a sufficient measure of appreciation for Jack LaLanne. Now, as a person who has recovered from some significant health issues, I wish Mr. LaLanne could have been a personal mentor! He understood health and he understood that all else in life shrinks in importance to health.

Not all of us are blessed with perfect health and I have found that everything else in life craters when our health is compromised!

We all have an important personal mission to accomplish with our life. We need to have the best health possible to make that happen!

In addition, we need to have a personal map of what our mission is and the steps that we will need to take to facilitate the accomplishment of our personal mission.

And sometimes…we need a mentor. Several individuals that I do not know personally serve as mentors to me! Their example, their stories, and their own personal missions inspire me and help me understand what I need to do in my efforts to serve the world through my own personal mission!

I hope you are inspired by today’s story and that you are working everyday to help your own personal mission find its fulfillment!

Jack LaLanne tribute: An inspiring story for seniors and advisors


Jack LaLanne, America’s first health and fitness guru, died Sunday, Jan. 23, 2011 at the age of 96. When I read the article scroll across the newsfeed, it caught me off guard. Usually, when someone dies in their 90s, it’s no surprise. But Jack LaLanne was no ordinary person. He was something of a superman.

In the spring of 2008, I had the great fortune of sitting down with LaLanne for a video interview. At the time, LaLanne, a spry 93, was in New York City promoting his new book, “Fiscal Fitness: 8 Steps to Wealth & Health from America’s Leaders in Fitness and Finance.” LaLanne co-wrote the book with financial expert Matthew J. Rettick. They explained to me how seniors can best upgrade their physical and fiscal health and how those two seemingly diverse topics actually go hand in hand.

In the July 2008 issue of Senior Market Advisor, we ran a story entitled “Super Seniors.” It should come as no surprise that Jack LaLanne was our lead senior in that feature.

As I wrote about LaLanne then:

“People of a certain generation–those growing up in the ’50s and ’60s–remember a familiar figure greeting them from their early morning television sets. Wearing a jumpsuit, sporting a physique carved like a Greek statue, he jumped, lunged and flexed muscles that most people didn’t know existed, all the while barking commands at the audience to get off the couch and join him in this foreign activity called exercise.”

When I spoke to LaLanne in 2008, he wore one of his trademark exercise outfits. When he shook my hand, my hand stung afterwards. He had continued an intense daily exercise regimen and maintained a sharp mind as well as a steadfast attitude regarding fitness and finances.

“Say you’re a multimillionaire, but you’ve got a big belly, health problems, your sex life is gone, you have aches and pains–what good is your money?” he told me in 2008. His words, which were spoken roughly six months prior to the financial meltdown, cast a chilling truth to what LaLanne saw as America’s excesses.

While exercise is his specialty, in writing “Fiscal Fitness,” he explained to me the similarities to being healthy financially and physically. “In both cases, you need to have a plan. So many people are financially bankrupt. It makes you sick. They spend money on this and that, with no plan of what they’re doing. They get to 30 or 40 years old, in debt up to their ears. They need a plan and part of that plan is going to an expert to get out of a financial rut.”

Jack LaLanne had a plan and he stuck to it through self discipline and hard work. I’ll leave you with one of my favorite quotes of his: “How do you build up your bank account? By putting something in it every day. Your health account is no different. What I do today, I am wearing tomorrow. If I put inferior foods in my body today, I’m going to be inferior tomorrow; it’s that simple.”

Story shared from the following website: http://www.thinkadvisor.com/2011/01/25/jack-lalanne-tribute-an-inspiring-story-for-senior

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